The DICOM is in the Details! Part 2 the Query Retrieve

 

Given the apparent interest in some of the details about DICOM store transactions, thank you to all who read it!  I thought I would add in a brief description of Query / Retrieve and then next week I will write about my favorite, Storage Commit.

A DICOM Query Retrieve transaction is a fairly simple transaction. First there is a query, and then a retrieve, luckily the standards team didn’t go crazy with the names. The first part is of course the query, which is a C-FIND transaction. In a C-FIND we again have a service class user (SCU) and a service class provider (SCP). The provider is going to be the “server” and the user the “client” or the one making the request. The query can be for a study or for a patient. However, it does not have to be only one. The query could be for “all” patients, or All studies done on a certain date, or if you get a wild hair, all dexa studies completed on Friday the 13th that have a patient who’s first name begins with the letter Q.

No matter what the C-FIND attributes are (specifics of the query) the user will send the query to the SCP (provider) and the provider will then issue a C-FIND response. The response is the list of studies that meet the criteria.  Different systems have built in mechanisms to deal with large C-FIND requests, some will reject the request if it is too broad, others will limit the number of responses to and arbitrary number such as 300, while still others don’t mind at all and simply send back a very long list of matches.

The client or SCU now has a list of studies and may decide to retrieve the studies. The command to retrieve a study is typically not “send me x study” it is often a C-MOVE command. Which roughly translates to “send X study over there” with the there usually being the requester. This is mostly semantical, but interesting to me. The C-MOVE command consists of what study is to be sent and where it is to be sent. The where is an Application Entity or AE title. Once the C-MOVE provider has this information, it then begins a DICOM Store transaction with the AE title requested.  For info on the DICOM Store,

see The DICOM is in the Details!

(Yes, shameless plug for clicks)

One interesting note here, in the C-MOVE command the only destination is the AE title, it does not include the IP address or port! This gets complex because almost every PACS and modality has a standard AE title that the vendor uses for EVERY SINGLE INSTALLATION, I won’t call out a single vendor, because they all do it. This was not a problem back in the day because relatively few systems queried each other, and they were often different vendors. Now however, when you are building an enterprise system like a VNA it is not uncommon at all to have many PACS or CPACS from the same vendor. Which brings AE uniqueness into play.

Some PACS will have the ability to use multiple AE titles so you can simply add a new AE for your VNA to send back to, and not change the modalities. Other PACS will only support one AE title and you may have to reconfigure all modalities sending to it. Last tangential point on Query / Retrieve is that this process of C-FIND and C-MOVE is pretty much what all data migration companies do. They simply do a lot of transactions!

Kyle Henson

Please let me know what topics you would like to discuss

Kyle@kylehenson.org

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Kyle Henson

I am a doctoral student, entrepreneur and longtime imaging professional. I truly love what I do and strive to make healthcare better for every patient that goes to a facility I work with. I apply the "my wife" principle to IT, if it was my wife having xxxx procedure what information would I want the physicians to have? If I provide that, I have done my job.

5 thoughts on “The DICOM is in the Details! Part 2 the Query Retrieve”

  1. Hey there would you mind sharing which blog platform you’re working with? I’m looking to start my own blog in the near future but I’m having a tough time making a decision between BlogEngine/Wordpress/B2evolution and Drupal. The reason I ask is because your design and style seems different then most blogs and I’m looking for something completely unique. P.S Sorry for getting off-topic but I had to ask!

  2. I do agree with all the ideas you’ve presented in your post. They are really convincing and will certainly work. Still, the posts are very short for starters. Could you please extend them a little from next time? Thanks for the post.

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